Don’t Call Her Mistress

The ominous footsteps heard by Marie belong to none other than Jaques, the thuggish bodyguard she has chosen.

Original artwork for the January 8, 1967 episode.

Well! That’s quite a twist on the old trope of the caveman clubbing a woman and dragging her back to his cave!

Marie’s fears are well-founded!

Jacques meets an unsavory end as the story concludes, and Saigen reappears as the audience for Kevin’s tale of the Norman Conquest, featuring his flaxen-haired ancestor.

The end of the chapter has arrived, but there are still 20 pages left in BIBLIOTEKA LALE — BROJ 174, most of which is filled with a military comic. I was curious to see who were the good guys and who was the enemy—after all, Yugoslavia was behind the iron curtain in 1968, when the comic book was published.

The series, apparently called “Partisan Ingenuity,” featured two episodes—the first of which was titled “Saboteur.” I had assumed the good guy was a Soviet soldier plotting against the Nazis. The saboteur was in fact a member of the Yugoslavian resistance. In real life, these partisans were led by Josip Broz Tito, who later became President of Yugoslavia. In the comic book, the saboteur is shown plotting against the fascists, and his mission is a smashing success. I was surprised to learn that Tito had in fact severed ties with Moscow in 1948, and by 1968, civic protests were erupting in cities, similar to what was happening in Paris and elsewhere. So, this comic basically served as nationalistic propaganda, much like Captain America and Sergeant Rock did in the USA.

The last couple of pages featured gag comics, and the back cover seemed to be hawking Disney product knock-offs.

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, visit his page on Facebook.

A Girl in Love

Things are going terribly for the “Saxon Dogs,” and especially so for Kevin Cardiff.

Marie must have inherited her tenderness from her mother—her father, D’Este, is shown to be a cold-hearted opportunist.

While Marie still has tender feelings for her erstwhile Sea God, Kevin knows only bitterness.

Having laid eyes on the man she loves, Marie comes up with an outlandish rescue plan.

To be continued…

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, visit his page on Facebook.

Love Your Enemy

Kevin and Marie have both experienced the sensation of love at first sight, but it’s complicated—Kevin thinks she has forsaken him.

Dealing with mixed emotions, Kevin makes his escape. (The panels from the Yugoslavian comic book are shown below).

Even as she watches her newfound infatuation bolt, Marie continues to help him.

Meanwhile, back in England, King Harold is unaware of the real danger he faces.

The December 11, 1966 episode is a wonderful example of Kreigh Collins’ skills as a cartoonist—the beautiful illustrations are filled with kinetic action and topped off with a historical tidbit found during his research of the subject matter.

The panel with the historical embroidery is also included in the Yugoslavian comic book.

To be continued…

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, visit his page on Facebook.

Biblioteka Lale — Broj 174

I recently wrote about a wonderful Christmas present I received from my friend Roger in Sweden—another awesome gift I received over the holiday season was sent by a friend in Serbia. Marko sent me scans of a KEVIN THE BOLD comic book published in the former Yugoslavia, likely from the early 1970s.

According to Marko, Biblioteka Lale was a magazine published by in the town of Gornji Milanovac, near Belgrade (now part of Serbia). It was released by Dečje novine, the largest comic book publisher in Yugoslavia. Besides this one, issue numbers 160, 180, and 206 also included Croatian translations of KEVIN THE BOLD.

Appearing on the first 46 pages of the comic book, Issue 174 features the entire “Story of the Norman Conquest” chapter, which originally ran from November, 1966 until January, 1967. Some other interesting comics in the rear portion of the comic book.

The first time I saw these Sunday comics I was confused—Kevin had blond hair! Because my collection was incomplete, I missed the fact that the chapter was a flashback, and the blond Kevin was an ancestor of Kreigh Collins’ protagonist.

The timeframe of the Norman Conquest preceded the action in KEVIN THE BOLD by about five centuries.

For a late-period episode, the illustration work is inspired, and the meeting of Marie and Kevin (Cardiff) is reminiscent of the one between Moya McCoy and Kevin (the Bold) from the comic strip’s debut chapter.

At this late stage in KEVIN THE BOLD’s existence, remember that the entire third tier of panels was absent from the more common third-page version—such a shame!

To be continued…

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, visit his page on Facebook.